National Society of Leadership and Success Inducts more than 170 Kutztown University Students in December 2018 Class

More than 170 Kutztown University students have been inducted into the National Society of Leadership and Success as part of the December 2018 class.

The NSLS is the nation’s largest leadership honor society. Students are selected by their college for membership based on either academic standing or leadership potential. Candidacy is a nationally recognized achievement of honorable distinction. With 662 chapters, the NSLS currently has 956,712 members nationwide.

In addition to honorable distinction, the NSLS provides a step-by-step program for members to build their leadership skills through participation at their campus or online. Upon completion of the program, members receive their leadership certificate and take their place among the top student leaders at their campus and across the country. Members are able to list their affiliation on all statements of personal accomplishment, including their resume.

Membership is for life and provides access to benefits including scholarships and awards, exclusive on-campus events, employer recruitment through an online job bank, and discounts on computers, textbooks, grad school prep courses, insurance and much more.

To be inducted at KU, students must attend an orientation, a three-hour leadership training seminar, three success networking team meetings and three speaker broadcasts featuring leading figures delivering success-related messages to members.

Marlene Cooper of Bally

Alyssa Daubenspeck of Reading

Lauren Erb of Oley

Audrey Gehringer of Hamburg

Aubrey Lengel of Reading

Tara Litwin of Reading

Courtney Morstatt of Topton

Giovanni Negron-Garcia of Reading

Claudia Savory of Oley

Amber Sites of Leesport

Kelly Slattery of Douglassville

Courtney Smith of Mohrsville

Alexander Swift of Leesport

Hanna Templin of Fleetwood

Paola Texidor of Reading

Zoe Texidor of Reading

Jeff Tineo of Reading

Ashley Simmons of Temple

Alexis Batz of Blandon serves as peer mentor at Delaware Valley University

Alexis Batz of Blandon, a Delaware Valley University student, was selected as a peer mentor for the 2018-19 academic year.

A team of Delaware Valley University upperclassmen was selected to mentor first-year students during the 2018/2019 academic year as part of the First-Year Peer Mentor program. Peer Mentors provide first-year students with academic, social, and personal encouragement as they navigate their first year at the University.

The First-Year Peer Mentor Program is integrated into the University’s DelVal Experience course, a first-year seminar focused on college and career readiness that engages students as members of the campus community. Under the guidance of the course instructor, each mentor works with a small group of first-year students. Mentors gain valuable leadership experience, and first-year students receive additional support as they navigate their first year on campus.

Lebanon Valley College recognizes fall student-athletes

The men’s soccer won 10 or more games for the third-consecutive season.

Lebanon Valley College recognized more than 250 student-athletes who competed for the Flying Dutchmen fall athletic teams.

Local athletes include:

Nicholas Sweitzer of Leesport, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Schuylkill Valley High School, Sweitzer is pursuing a bachelor of science in business administration.

Nicholas Bentz of Reading, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Exeter Township High School, Bentz is pursuing a bachelor of science in exercise science.

Victor Morcelo of Reading, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Berks Catholic High School, Morcelo is pursuing a bachelor of science in accounting.

Anthony Jenkins of Reading, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Muhlenberg High School, Jenkins is pursuing a bachelor of science in business administration.

Daymond Zweizig of Reading, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Oley Valley High School, Zweizig is pursuing a bachelor of science in psychology and business administration.

George Limberiou of Reading, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Schuylkill Valley High School, Limberiou is pursuing a bachelor of science in exercise science.

Logan Grauer of Mohrsville, a member of the football team. Lebanon Valley’s football team posted a 2-8 record in 2018. Despite their record, the Dutchmen won its final two games of the season, including a thrilling 30-24 2OT victory over MAC rivals Albright, sparking the March on Kreiderheim.

A graduate of Schuylkill Valley High School, Grauer is pursuing a bachelor of arts in applied history.

Charlotte Jones of Fleetwood, a member of the women’s cross country team. For women’s cross country, the Dutchmen enjoyed one of their best-ever seasons, as it was the first time they placed three runners inside the top-10 at MAC Championships and they posted their lowest point total in program history to place second out of 17 teams. On the men’s side, LVC placed sixth at MAC Championships and Noah Griffin earned MAC Rookie of the Year honors.

A graduate of Fleetwood Area High School, Jones is pursuing a bachelor of science in digital communications and art and visual culture.

Marah Hoffman of Birdsboro, a member of the women’s cross country team. For women’s cross country, the Dutchmen enjoyed one of their best-ever seasons, as it was the first time they placed three runners inside the top-10 at MAC Championships and they posted their lowest point total in program history to place second out of 17 teams. On the men’s side, LVC placed sixth at MAC Championships and Noah Griffin earned MAC Rookie of the Year honors.

A graduate of Exeter Township High School, Hoffman is pursuing a bachelor of arts in English and creative writing.

Local resident Christine Kelly embarks on undergraduate career at Tufts University

Christine Kelly, from Birdsboro, has joined more than 1,500 undergraduate students from around the world as they begin their academic careers at Tufts University, located in Medford/Somerville, Mass.

In all, only 14.6 percent of a record breaking 21,501 applicants were admitted to the university, the second-lowest acceptance rate in university history.

The university’s Class of 2022 is the most diverse class ever, the beneficiary of the largest commitment of financial aid in university history, and a trailblazer in gender parity among engineering students – all while maintaining Tufts’ status as one of the most selective universities in the country.

Thirty-seven percent of first-year U.S. undergraduates identify as students of color, a Tufts record. The 1,544-member undergraduate class received $25.8 million in need-based grants, a new mark for financial aid commitment by the university. And the incoming engineering class nearly reached gender parity, with 49 percent of students identifying as women.

“We often talk about creating an intentional community,” said Karen Richardson, dean of admissions and enrollment management at the Class of 2022’s matriculation ceremony. “With the Class of 2022, we have put together a group of learners who will contribute not only academically but also to our community’s social fabric.”

KUR receives IBS award nominations in five programming categories

Kutztown University Radio has been nominated in five programming categories for the 2019 Intercollegiate Broadcasting System Awards to be held in New York City Saturday, March 2, 2019, at the 79th International IBS Conference.

KUR has been nominated for:

– Best Community Outreach Event – “Sounds by South Campus”

– Best Football Play-By-Play – KUR Football

– Best Specialty Music Show – “The Coming Out Special”

– Best Documentary – “History of Music – Videogames”

– Best Radio Drama – “The Break ‘Zombie Special'”

Last year, KUR brought home the most trophies in organization history at the 2018 IBS awards. KUR was the winner of both the Best Station Playlist/Music Selection and the Best Specialty Show. The station was also named a finalist in six categories. In recent years, KUR has also taken home the “Golden Microphone” for Best News Interview and Best Use of Social Media.

For more information, visit the Kutztown University Radio website.

BLOTTER: Kutztown Borough Police Department

Dec. 25, 2018

  • Police investigated the report of vandalism to a door and window following an incident that occurred at a residence in the 500 block of College Boulevard.
  • After completing their investigation, police arrested Joseph Wunderly, 19, of Northampton, for driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance; one way roadways; minor prohibited from operating vehicle with alcohol; and for purchase, consumption, possession or transportation of liquor or malt or brewed beverages following an incident that occurred in the 300 block of Sacony Alley.

Dec. 26, 2018

  • After completing their investigation, police arrested Hajeem Fish, 34, of Reading, for driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance and for one-way roadways following an incident that occurred in the 200 block of Sander Alley.

Dec. 27, 2018

  • After completing their investigation, police arrested Paul Goodwin, 41, of Bowers, for driving under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance; driver required to be licensed; operating a vehicle without financial responsibility; operating a motor vehicle without rear lights; and for certification/inspection required following an incident that occurred in the 200 block of Trexler Avenue.

Kutztown University announces 2018-19 track & field roster

Kutztown University will have 92 student-athletes representing its track & field program for the 2018-19 season.

Kutztown has won 19 combined conference championships in school history in track & field. KU had four individual conference champions last year and is under the guidance of 13-year head coach Ray Hoffman.

KU’s home-opener is scheduled for Jan. 10-11, 2019, with the Golden Bear Invitational at O’Pake Fieldhouse.

Trinity Ponton of West Reading

David Awurumibe of West Lawn

Jared Luckanitz of Reading

First solo flight for EMU at Lancaster student-pilot: Marine Corps veteran Christopher Leiva

Christopher Leiva, a student in EMU at Lancaster’s aviation program, poses for a photo after his first solo flight earlier this month. Students in the four-year aviation program begin flight school in their first semester and will eventually earn several flight certifications, as well as a bachelor’s degree in leadership and organizational management. (Photo courtesy of Aero-Tech Services, Inc.)

Christopher Leiva – a first-year student in Eastern Mennonite University’s new leadership and organizational management bachelor’s degree program with a concentration in aviation – has completed his first solo flight.

Leiva, a former U.S. Marine, decided to become a pilot, he writes below, as a passenger in a flight over the Persian Gulf, so high he could cover countries with the span of his hand. Although his celebration of his first solo flight may have been subtle, it was an important accomplishment in his lifelong passion for travel freedom.

A resident of Blandon, Pennsylvania, Leiva soloed on Oct. 25. His flight instructor is Mitchel Shenk.

He answered a few questions about his passion for flying:

Why are you interested in aviation and when did you make the decision that this was in your future?

Freedom of travel has always been of the utmost importance to me. It started when I got my driver’s license, then my motorcycle license, then my boating license. But the source of that freedom most rewarding to me is flying. The decision to make flying a part of my future, and actually being behind the controls, occurred when I took my first flight as a passenger in a V-22 Osprey. I was gazing out the rear of the aircraft as we flew around the Persian Gulf. As I stared I stretched the fingers of my hand and noticed that I covered several countries with my span. I remember thinking to myself, “The next time I do this, I’m going to be behind the controls.” It doesn’t have to be a military aircraft, but I would just like to experience that feeling again and again.

What was your first solo experience like?

I was fairly confident with my abilities to communicate with air traffic control, taxi the runway, take off, fly the pattern, and land safely. The winds were calm and the sky was clear so it literally was a smooth ride.

Did you do anything special to celebrate this big step in your career?

I celebrated by reflecting on this accomplishment as I stared at a C-17 parked at the west ramp. I pondered the next steps in the program at EMU and Aero-Tech Services, and how far I’ve come and how much closer I am to accomplishing my goals.

Why did you choose Lancaster at EMU for your professional preparation?

There are several reasons I chose EMU at Lancaster. The leadership and organizational management degree has real world application and relevance. The aviation concentration provided the opportunity to fly and to begin a career in aviation. Its schedule is convenient for adult students and is definitely worth the forty-five minute commute.

What have you most enjoyed about the program?

I enjoy the interaction with peers in the program. There’s a comraderie between us because we’re all working toward similar goals. I enjoy the schedule because it allows ample time to attend to our other affairs such as work and family. But what I enjoy the most is actually being behind the controls during flight training.

What are your professional goals?

My professional goals are to fly for a state or government agency. I’m also interested in flying charter flights around the Caribbean and Central America.

Kutztown Community Library announces bus trip

On Tuesday, March 5, 2019, the Kutztown Community Library is sponsoring a bus trip to the Philadelphia Flower Show. This year’s theme is Flower Power and pays tribute to the enormous impact of flowers on our lives.

The cost is $80 per person and includes bus fare, driver’s tip and admission; lunch is NOT included.

For more information, call the library at 610.683.5820. The Kutztown Community Library is located at 70 Bieber Alley.