Collin Barker Presents Scientific Research at Disappearing Boundaries

Collin Barker Presents Scientific Research at Disappearing Boundaries

Collin Barker of Wernersville was one of 37 Lebanon Valley College students who presented their scientific work from summer research projects at the annual Disappearing Boundaries Summer Research Meeting held in July at Albright College. Barker, a graduate of Lancaster Country Day School, is pursuing a bachelor of science in physics at The Valley.

The annual event is designed to uniquely blend students and faculty with their counterparts from other institutions and disciplines. The meeting, brainchild of Lebanon Valley’s Dr. Walter Patton, associate professor of chemistry, has become a collaboration of Central Pennsylvania colleges, including Albright, Dickinson, Elizabethtown, Gettysburg, Messiah, and Wilkes, among others. Core to the concept is the idea that science benefits from networking, even among a myriad of scientific disciplines.

Anthony Knarr of Oley Received a Bachelor’s Degree from University of the Sciences

The seventh annual bachelor’s degree conferment ceremony was held May 18, 2018; some 160 USciences students in the doctor of occupational therapy, doctor of physical therapy and doctor of pharmacy programs were granted bachelor of science degrees. Photo courtesy University of the Sciences

Anthony Knarr of Oley Received a Bachelor’s Degree from University of the Sciences

Anthony Knarr of Oley graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of science in pharmaceutical and healthcare studies degree from University of the Sciences and was recognized at a bachelor’s degree conferment ceremony on Friday, May 18, 2018.

Knarr continues in the doctor of pharmacy program.

Central Penn College to offer phlebotomy certificate

Central Penn College to offer phlebotomy certificate

Flexible courses, three terms for new program

Beginning in the fall term, Central Penn College will offer a new phlebotomy technician certificate as part of its Medical Assisting program. Phlebotomy technicians work at hospitals, diagnostic laboratories, blood donor centers and private medical offices.

“I am excited that Central Penn will be preparing phlebotomy students to become essential members of the healthcare team,” says Nikki Marhefka, director of the college’s Medical Assisting program. “These technicians begin the process of laboratory testing, which plays a vital role in the diagnosis and prevention of disease. This is an additional certification to the many vibrant allied health programs offered at the college,” says Marhefka.

Students will be trained to:

  • Draw blood samples from patients
  • Perform basic testing, such as blood glucose levels
  • Prepare blood, urine and other specimens for testing
  • Verify patient/donor identity

“Many employers require professional certification,” says Dr. Krista Wolfe, dean of the School of Nursing Continue reading “Central Penn College to offer phlebotomy certificate”

Library to present two-part teen program

Northeast Branch of Reading Public Library to present two-part teen program by Council on Chemical Abuse

Reading – The Northeast Branch of Reading Public Library, 1348 N. 11th St., will feature a two-part program for teens titled, “Clear and Present Danger.”

The program presented by The Council on hemical Abuse will be held from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, July 19 and Thursday, July 26.

The program is free of charge and no registration is needed. For more information, call 610,655.6361.

This program is part of a series of programs being held at Reading Public Library in support of the Berks County Public Libraries 2018 Summer Read, Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic. The Summer Read is a collective multi-county read for adults taking place from April through September.

More information on the Summer Read is available atwww.berkslibraries.org/a-summer-read.

Bally Mennonite Church seeks donations by Aug. 31 for refugee hygiene kits

Bally Mennonite Church seeks donations by Aug. 31 for refugee hygiene kits
Does your heart break for displaced families? Ours does too! There is something we can do together!
Bally Mennonite Church is collecting supplies for Refugee Hygiene Kits, which are distributed all around the world by the Mennonite Central Committee (mcc.org); we welcome your contributions through Aug. 31.
Thank you for limiting your generosity to the following specific new manufacturer-packaged items:
  • 1 adult-size toothbrush (in manufacturer’s packaging)
  • 1 large bar of soap (leave in wrapper)
  • 1 nail clipper (good quality)
  • 1 hand towel (medium weight, dark or bright colors; approx. 16 by 26 inches)
  • 1 wide-toothed comb (6 to 8 inches.)
Drop off box under carport at Bally Mennonite Church, 1481 Route 100, Bally.
For more information, call 610.845.7780 or visit ballymc.org.

Club raises funds for Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Research

Pictured from left in the top row are Emma Mattson, Olivia Escalona, Alexis Hartl, Kenadie Shreiner and Brian Yagle; bottom from left are Kylie Pinkett, Sarah Black, Izzy Thomas, Mila Althouse and Emily Snyder.

Honey Brook Elementary Center’s Community Service Club raises funds for Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Research

Most clubs at Honey Brook Elementary Center are formed to provide children with an extra-curricular activity after school. But recently, a different type of club was created. The Community Service Club consisted of a group of ten, fourth-grade students who banded together to try and help others. In the first-ever project of their existence, the club decided to organize an Alex’s Lemonade Stand in the hopes of raising much-needed money for pediatric cancer research. Those efforts yielded great results!

During a two-week time period, club members sold lemonade during the school’s lunch periods. Under the guidance of their advisers, 4th grade teacher, Janeen Moyer and 3rd grade teacher, Brian Emerich, the group made and sold nearly 75 gallons of lemonade at 50 cents per cup. They also held a stand during the school’s Evening of the Arts and Grandparents’ Day celebrations. Including sales and donations, the group contributed a total of $852.98 to the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Research.

Members of the group included Mila Althouse, Sarah Black, Olivia Escalona, Alexis Hartl, Emma Mattson, Kylie Pinkett, Kenadie Shreiner, Emily Snyder, Izzy Thomas and Brian Yagle. Group members met once per Continue reading “Club raises funds for Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Research”

Reading Public Library to present program on opioid abuse and mental health

Reading Public Library to present program on opioid abuse and mental health

Reading Public Library will present a program entitled “Opioid Abuse and Mental Health: Connections and Crossroads” at 11 a.m., Saturday, June 23, at RPL Main, 100 S. 5th St.

Featured speaker, Samir Naber of Greater Reading Mental Health Alliance, will discuss the connection between opioid abuse and mental health issues.

Included in the discussion will be the book “Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic,” by Sam Quinones. This book is the first in a series of books featured in “A Summer Read,” a collective multi-county read for adults taking place from April through September.

The book is available through any Berks County Library or through the e-media platform, “Overdrive.”

This event is free of charge and pre-registration is not required. For more information, contact the Reading Public Library Reference Department at 610.655.6355.

Priscilla Songate of Mohrsville travels to diverse area to provide healthcare for refugees

Priscilla Songate of Mohrsville travels to diverse area to provide healthcare for refugees

Cedarville University sophomore nursing major Priscilla Songate of Mohrsville is serving more than 90 different people groups within the span of six days. How? By traveling less than 600 miles away to what has been called the most diverse square mile of the country: Clarkston, Ga.

From May 14 through 20, Songate with 10 other team members from Cedarville served in Clarkston, a town that has become home to refugees from all over the world. The team is led by Dr. Brenda Pahl, assistant professor of pharmacy practice. It includes two nursing students, six pharmacy students, one registered nurse and one linguistics student who will assist with translation.

While in Clarkston, the team will provide health care screenings at three different refugee clinics. They will also visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and attend multicultural church services as part of their experience.

“Considering how expensive medical care is, my hope is that our trip will, even in the smallest way, ease the community’s burden caused by health issues,” said Songate. “I am also very excited to have an interpreter on our team because the language barrier is a major issue in the refugee community.”

The trip is through Encompass World Partners, a ministry that serves in 34 countries around the world. While Cedarville has sent teams through the ministry before, this is the first medical missions trip. The team hopes that it will be the first of many in the years ahead.

Alison McQuarrie of Conway Inducted Into the Healthcare Administration Honor Society at Scranton

Alison McQuarrie of Conway Inducted Into the Healthcare Administration Honor Society at Scranton

Alison McQuarrie of Conway was among the 54 University of Scranton students inducted into Upsilon Phi Delta, the national honor society for graduate and undergraduate students in healthcare administration programs. Students must have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.5 for induction. The University’s chapter of the honor society was established in 2002.

McQuarrie is a graduate student pursuing a Health Administration degree at the Jesuit university.

Jessica Hume Voted to ESU Active Minds Executive Board

Jessica Hume Voted to ESU Active Minds Executive Board

EAST STROUDSBURG – East Stroudsburg University’s chapter of Active Minds has elected their leadership for the next academic year. Jessica Hume of Wernersville is among those elected to take on a leadership role in the organization.

Raquel Sosa, a junior majoring in psychology from Wilkes-Barre was elected president. Sosa has also been elected president of the Student Advisory Committee of Active Minds, Inc. Active Minds, Inc. is a national nonprofit organization that empowers students to speak openly about mental health and combats stigma surrounding mental illness through different events and program initiatives. The SAC is comprised of 20 student leaders from the entire Active Minds chapter network of over 400 chapters. The SAC’s primary role is to contribute the student voice to Active Minds’ efforts and to advise national staff in the areas of student engagement, fundraising, program planning, and promotion. As the SAC president, Sosa will sit on the board of directors for the national organization and attend and participate in board meetings in Washington, D.C.

“This organization means a lot to me; it has given me purpose on campus and has made my college career unforgettable,” Sosa said. “I am incredibly honored to be on the board of directors and excited to become more deeply involved in an organization that has given me so much.”

Along with Sosa serving as president, the ESU chapter of Active Minds is led by Co-Vice Presidents Melissa Schneider, a sophomore majoring in computer science from Dunmore, and Reyanna Keglovitz, a sophomore majoring in integrated art and design from Nazareth; Secretary, Alice Ritchison, a freshman majoring in early childhood education from Perkasie; Treasurer, Jessica Hume, a freshman majoring in biology from Wernersville; Fundraising Chair, Kassandra Krase, a freshman majoring in biology from East Stroudsburg; and Publicity Chair, Isabella Pistilli, a freshman majoring in psychology from Eagleville.