Maureen McGarry Named to Summer 2018 Dean’s List at University of the Sciences

Maureen McGarry Named to Summer 2018 Dean’s List at University of the Sciences

PHILADELPHIA – Maureen McGarry has been named to the Summer 2018 Dean’s List at University of the Sciences.

Selection for this award is based on completing and passing all assigned courses with no grade below a “C” and attaining an academic average of at least 3.4 for courses taken in the summer of 2018.

McGarry of Blandon is a doctor of pharmacy student.

University of the Sciences has prepared students to be leaders and practitioners in the healthcare and science fields for nearly 200 years.

Key to its distinctive education is a tradition of hands-on research and experiential learning that is evident in every graduate who has walked its campus. Since its founding in 1821 as Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, the first college of pharmacy in North America, USciences has grown to more than 30 degree-granting programs from bachelor’s through doctoral degrees in the health sciences, bench sciences, and healthcare business and policy fields. Discover how USciences students are proven everywhere they go at usciences.edu.

KU Student Awarded Grant from Kutztown University Trustee to Create Physics Labs for Visually Impaired

KU student Morganne Bennett with Dr. Jolynn Haney, Kutztown University Trustee

KU Student Awarded Grant from Kutztown University Trustee to Create Physics Labs for Visually Impaired

KUTZTOWN – Morganne Bennett, an education of the visually impaired major in her junior year at Kutztown University, is spending her spare time in the lab this semester.

Bennett, of Hillsborough, N.J., is working with Dr. Paul V. Quinn, associate professor of physics, to create physics labs for the visually impaired. To do so, Bennett and Quinn are focusing their research on making the labs more tactile to appeal to the senses other than vision.

Their research was bolstered by a grant from Dr. Jolynn Haney ’84 M’93, a member of KU’s Council of Trustees since 2016, who is currently serving as secretary.

“This means a lot to me because I hope to teach students who are visually impaired; but since every student is different, we have to work on making general improvements in the lab to make it more tactile,” Bennett said. “Dr. Haney’s contribution will allow me to focus on improving KU’s resources for students who are visually impaired so that labs will truly appeal to all students on campus.”

The grant will support Bennett with funding to continue her research.

Haney presented the grant to Bennett Thursday, Sept. 27.

“People in the physics field are hesitant to work with those who are visually impaired because most of the research is completed using graphs. Labs like these will make the field accessible to a new population,” Quinn said. “Students who are visually impaired will be able to experience the concepts of physics in the world around them with their own senses.”

Bennett and Quinn are taking five pre-existing physics labs and making them tactile by creating a board with three functions that is tailored to the needs of students who are visually impaired. The first function is a magnetic graphing tool that will take the place of Microsoft Excel. The second function includes a series of pegs and holes that will allow students to plot data, and the third function consists of felt and velcro that can be used to create maps.

“It’s important that every student has the same opportunities. Labs friendly to students who are visually impaired will not only benefit them, but it will also help professors better understand student needs,” Bennett said. “Having a lab specifically designed for this will give professors better ideas of how to help students in the future, especially since we have many students who are visually impaired at KU.”

To learn more on physics at KU, check out their department website or contact the physical sciences department at simpson@kutztown.edu or by phone at 610-683-4447.

A lifetime approach to lowering cholesterol is still key to reducing cardiovascular risk

A lifetime approach to lowering cholesterol is still key to reducing cardiovascular risk

Updated cholesterol guidelines offer more personalized risk assessment, additional treatment options for people at the highest risk

More personalized risk assessments and new cholesterol-lowering drug options for people at the highest risk for cardiovascular disease are among the key recommendations in the 2018 cholesterol guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

The guidelines were presented at the Association’s 2018 Scientific Sessions conference in Chicago, the premier annual global forum for the exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. The guidelines were simultaneously published in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

“The updated guidelines reinforce the importance of healthy living, lifestyle modification and prevention. They build on the major shift we made in our 2013 cholesterol recommendations to focus on identifying and addressing lifetime risks for cardiovascular disease,” said Ivor Benjamin, M.D., FAHA, Continue reading “A lifetime approach to lowering cholesterol is still key to reducing cardiovascular risk”

American Heart Association calls for adoption of newly released DHHS physical activity guidelines

American Heart Association calls for adoption of the newly released U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition

American Heart Association President Ivor Benjamin, M.D. FAHA, issued the following comments on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ second edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans released at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions today.

“The American Heart Association has long recognized the importance of physical activity in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, stroke and other noncommunicable diseases. We’re committed to developing programs and advocating for public policy that make it easier to get more physical activity, regardless of where you live. These latest guidelines reinforce the importance of moving more and sitting less.

The American Heart Association stands committed to addressing chronic disease prevention through programs and policies supporting increased physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior to help people live longer, healthier lives for themselves, their families and their communities.

Only 26 percent of men, 19 percent of women and 20 percent of adolescents report enough activity to meet the physical activity recommendations. But changing sedentary time to active time in any way – even in small amounts – can have health benefits, according to a key finding in the guidelines.

With a focus on being a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives, the American Heart Association advocates for policies supporting physical education and physical activity in schools and early care and education, bike and pedestrian infrastructure, safe routes to school and Complete Streets Continue reading “American Heart Association calls for adoption of newly released DHHS physical activity guidelines”

Matthew Hope of Wyomissing elected to statewide Medical Society post

Students from Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (GCSOM) were well represented at the Pennsylvania Medical Society (PAMED) annual House of Delegates meeting in Hershey on Oct. 26. At the podium during the event is Matthew Hope of Wyomissing, a member of GCSOM’s Class of 2020, who was elected Medical Student Trustee to the PAMED Board of Trustees. Speaking, to the left of the podium, is John Curtis of Conshohocken, a member of GCSOM’s Class of 2020, who was elected Foundation Student Trustee-elect to the Board of the Foundation of the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

Matthew Hope of Wyomissing elected to statewide Medical Society post

Matthew Hope of Wyomissing, a medical student at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, elected to a position on the governing council of the Medical Student Section of the Pennsylvania Medical Society. The elections were held at PAMED’s annual House of Delegates meeting in Hershey on Oct. 26.

During the meeting, PAMED’s Medical Student Section held elections for statewide offices. Several GCSOM students were elected to leadership positions.

Nathan Hoff of Honesdale, a member of GCSOM’s Class of 2020, was elected Chair of the Medical Student Section. As chair, he will preside over all MSS Governing Council meetings and will represent PAMED at the American Medical Association’s Medical Student Section meetings in June and November.

Matthew Hope of Wyomissing, a member of GCSOM’s Class of 2020, was elected Medical Student Trustee to the PAMED Board of Trustees. As a trustee, he will represent Pennsylvania’s medical students at PAMED Board of Trustee meetings and functions and serve as a liaison between the Medical Student Section Governing Council and PAMED.

Anis Adnani of Pittsburgh, a member of GCSOM’s Class of 2021, was elected Medical Student Continue reading “Matthew Hope of Wyomissing elected to statewide Medical Society post”

Shoemakersville’s Leigh Kissinger Received a Physical Therapy White Coat from University of the Sciences

Shoemakersville’s Leigh Kissinger Received a Physical Therapy White Coat from University of the Sciences

SHOEMAKERSVILLE – Leigh Kissinger of Shoemakersville, a doctor of physical therapy student at University of the Sciences, received a white coat at the annual Physical Therapy White Coat Ceremony Sept. 8, 2018. The White Coat Ceremony is an annual rite of passage for students entering the professional phase of the Doctor of Physical Therapy program.

Kissinger continues on the path to receiving a doctor of physical therapy degree in May 2021. Donning their white coats, the more than 70 student-physical therapists recited the Oath of a Physical Therapist, a gesture to reinforce their commitment to working with patients compassionately and to enhancing their health and well-being.

University of the Sciences has prepared students to be leaders and practitioners in the healthcare and science fields for nearly 200 years. Key to our distinctive education is a tradition of hands-on research and experiential learning that is evident in every graduate who has walked its campus. Since its founding in 1821 as Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, the first college of pharmacy in North America, USciences has grown to more than 30 degree-granting programs from bachelor’s through doctoral degrees in the health sciences, bench sciences, and healthcare business and policy fields. Discover how USciences students are proven everywhere they go at usciences.edu.

SUICIDE PREVENTION: Nov. 11 is Veteran’s Day

Nov. 11 is Veteran’s Day

The rate of suicide is a problem for all in the U.S. and is significantly higher among veterans. According to the V.A. National Suicide Data Report | U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, there were more than 6,000 Veteran suicides each year from 2008 to 2016. In 2016, the suicide rate was 1.5 times greater for Veterans than for non-Veteran adults, after adjusting for age and gender. Programs and services have been established to help veterans and their loved ones.

Veterans in crisis and their loved ones can call, text, or chat to connect with caring VA responders at the free and confidential Veterans Crisis Line. Responders are qualified to deal with any immediate crisis.

If you are a Veteran or you know a Veteran who is showing any of these signs, call the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online at VeteransCrisisLine.net/Chat, or text to 838255.

To learn more about the issue of Veteran suicide as well as VA mental health resources, please visit www.mentalhealth.va.gov, where you’ll find the latest national and state-level research.

Veterans and their loved ones also can visit MakeTheConnection.net to explore information on mental health issues and hear stories from Veterans who have faced challenges like theirs, including posttraumatic stress disorder, substance use problems, transitioning from service, and more.

International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day is Nov. 17, 2018

Find the Survivor Day Nearest You at https://afsp.org/find-support/ive-lost-someone/survivor-day/.

About Survivor Day

Survivor Day is the one day a year when people affected by suicide loss gather around the world at events in their local communities to find comfort and gain understanding as they share stories of healing and hope. On Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, loss survivors will gather around the globe in small and large events while growing together in their grief journey.

Survivor Day Calendar go to https://afsp.org/find-support/ive-lost-someone/survivor-day/

November

  • 07 NOV FACEBOOK LIVE DISCUSSION ON HEALING AFTER SUICIDE LOSS
  • 12 NOV AFSP TWITTER CHAT – HEALING AFTER A SUICIDE LOSS
  • 14 NOV ASK DR. JILL FACEBOOK LIVE – HEALING AFTER SUICIDE LOSS
  • 17 NOV SURVIVOR DAY – IN PERSON OR VIA FACEBOOK LIVE

KUTZTOWN SAAC HOLDS SIXTH ANNUAL MAIN STREET CLEANUP ON HOMECOMING WEEKEND

Kutztown SAAC Holds Sixth Annual Main Street Cleanup on Homecoming Weekend

KUTZTOWN SAAC HOLDS SIXTH ANNUAL MAIN STREET CLEANUP ON HOMECOMING WEEKEND

10/17/2018 | Student-Athlete Advisory Committee
KUTZTOWN – The Kutztown University Student-Athlete Advisory Committee continued its yearly initiative to give back to its community. SAAC held its Main Street Cleanup for the sixth-straight year, cleaning the streets of downtown Kutztown on Homecoming weekend.

KU’s SAAC has been participating in the Main Street cleanup since 2013, volunteering its time the Sunday morning following Homecoming to clean its local community.

More than 200 KU student-athletes participated in the annual event, cleaning up after Saturday’s festivities with gloves and trash bags in hand, trying to show their appreciation for the town and giving back to the Borough of Kutztown.

Contact SAAC advisor Don Justus via email at justus@kutztown.edu if you would like to know how to get involved or want additional information about the organization.

Kutztown Football to Support AFCA’s Coach to Cure MD Program on Saturday

Kutztown Football to Support AFCA’s Coach to Cure MD Program on Saturday
8/31/2018 | Football
KUTZTOWN – Just as in years past, head coach Jim Clements and the Kutztown University football staff is wearing American Football Coaches Association patches on their shirts to promote the association and bring awareness to its programs. The season-opener was Saturday, Sept. 1.

Coach To Cure MD began in 2008 with more than 200 schools and 2,675 coaches involved. 10 years later, that effort has expanded to 620 different schools and more than 11,350 coaches wearing the logo patch on the sidelines and participating in Coach To Cure MD events – a growth of more than 325 percent.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common fatal genetic disorder diagnosed during childhood, primarily affecting boys of all races and cultures. People with Duchenne develop progressive muscle weakness that eventually causes loss of mobility, wheelchair dependency, and a decline in respiratory and cardiac function. Currently, there is no cure for Duchenne. But thanks to Coach To Cure MD and the work of Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy, there is hope.

The AFCA will coordinate a multi-platform social media campaign throughout opening weekend using the hashtag #AFCAPatch. For more information on the AFCA and its promotional patch weekend, visit www.afca.com or follow AFCA on social media. You may also call the AFCA office at 254-754-9900.

About the AFCA 
The American Football Coaches Association was founded in 1922 and is considered the primary professional association for football coaches at all levels of competition. The 11,000-member organization includes more than 90 percent of head coaches at the 700-plus schools that sponsor football at the college level. Members include coaches from Europe, Canada, Australia, Japan and Mexico.

About PPMD 
Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) is the largest, most comprehensive nonprofit organization in the United States focused on finding a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy – our mission is to end Duchenne.

We invest deeply in treatments for this generation of people affected by Duchenne and in research that will benefit future generations. We advocate in Washington, D.C., and have secured hundreds of millions of dollars in funding. We demand optimal care, and we strengthen, unite and educate the global Duchenne community.

Everything we do – and everything we have done since our founding in 1994 – helps people with Duchenne live longer, stronger lives. We will not rest until every person has a treatment to end Duchenne. Go to www.ParentProjectMD.org for more information or to learn how you can support our efforts and help families affected by Duchenne.